Lorestan Dances

Collected & Researched by: Mansureh Sabetzadeh
Verfügbarkeit: Am Lager
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Sorna: Shamirza Moradi
Kamanche: Seyd Mirza Azizi
Vocals: Ahmad Ali Rezayi

Collected & Researched by: Mansureh Sabetzadeh

 Songs and Tunes of Festivities
Usually Lori dances use songs without words, but occasionally they are accompanied by lyrics, as in the case of sangin sama to which bena bena and harbazazake are sung.
Music of sorna and dohol is performed outdoors but in the family household kamanche and tombak are heard, a recent phenomenon. Singing taranehs are accompanied by them. Taranehs have two old and new types. Song based on principle maqams are the older ones, like zang zang. But others are derived from them. Nowadays, all of dance maqams are played by kamanche and tombak and festivity songs accompany them. They have epic, lyric or melancholic contents.
In wedding feasts after dancing and prancing is finished, verses of old poems (like Khosrow and Shirin) are recited: then the turn is for Shahnameh-Khani during which the love story of Tahmineh and Rostam, Zal and Rudabeh, and epic tales of Gordafarid, Siavash, Sohrab are told. Meanwhile the bride is made up. The singer soothes the bride that her new house is more intimate than her father's. And suggests the tailor to make a beautiful suit for the bridegroom, and advise him to be kind and benevolent to his bride.
Naqareh is one of the introductory pieces in wedding festivities. It could be of common origin with naqareh and navai, respectively of Kurdish and Lori people. Savarani of Loris is also played by Kurds. Qanaqana with or without words is performed with sorna and dohol in feats of marriage.
Jangara (or Savarbazi) is an epic maqam, played by sorna and dohol, also called savarane. It is played during wartimes to excite the bravery of the young soldiers. It is occasionally played in wedding ceremonies, when the bride is taken to the groom's house. When playing jangara, young horseriders chase domestic poultry and cattle and shoot them.
The groom helps his bride to take off the horse and his act is sometimes accompanied by tunes of sorna and dohol, and women sing sit biaram. ...

Published [09/11/2003]